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General data  
Year/s of production 1961                                       
VIN 2819 GT
Number produced 1
Design Giotto Bizzarrini
Manufactured by Piero Drogo – Carrozzeria Sports Cars Modena
   
Technical specifications  
Chassis 539/61 Competizione – Steel tubular frame, oval cross section, tube frame
Length
Width
Height
Wheelbase 2400 mm
Front suspension Independent wheel suspension, double delta wishbones, coil springs, hydraulic telescope shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
Rear suspension Rigid axle, half elliptical longitudinal leaf springs, double trailing links, hydraulic telescope shock absorbers
Front track 1354 mm
Rear track 1350 mm
Front tyres 6 x 16 in., Borrani wheels with wired spokes and central locking – three prongs
Tyres: 185 x 16 Disk brakes Racing
Rear tyres 6 x 16 in., Borrani wheels with wired spokes and central locking – three prongs
Tyres: 185 x 16 Dunlop Racing
Front brakes Hydraulically operated disc brakes
Rear brakes Hydraulically operated disc brakes
Kerb weight Approx. 935 kg
Body material Very thin aluminium
Body type „Breadvan” body – two seats
   
Engine  
Type 168Comp./61 – Colombo front engine
Number of cylinders V12 – 60°
Displacement 2953 ccm,
Bore and stroke 73 x 58,8 mm
Camshaft 1 overhead per cylinder bank
Valves 2 per cylinder
Compression ratio 9,7:1
Ignition Single ignition, outside sparkplugs
Lubrication Dry sump lubrication
Maximum power Approx. 293 hp – 7.000 rpm
Maximum torque Approx. 275 Nm (28 mkg)  – 5.500 rpm
Carburettor 6 Weber twin carburettors, type 38 DCN
Gearbox 4 gears + rev.
   
Performance  
Top Speed  Approx. 285 km/h

 

Good to know:

  • Car is based on 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione
  • Bulit and designed by Piero Drogos Carrozzeria Sports Cars in Modea, Giotto Bizzarrini and the engine specialists Giorgio Neri and Luciano Bonacini

Short Racing History:
250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione body:

  • Tour de France 1961: Ecurie Francorschamps, Racing drivers:  Olivier Gendebien/Lucien Bianchi, no. 145, 2nd place in class and 2nd overall
  • 1000 km de Paris Montlhery 1961: Scuderia SSS di Venezia, Racing drivers: Maurice Trintignant/Nino Vaccarella, no 1, 3rd place in class and 3rd overall

“Breadvan”  body:

  • 24 Hours Le Mans 1962: Scuderia SSS di Venezia, Racing drivers: Carlo Maria Abate/Colin Davis, no 16, retired
  • Guards Trophy Brands Hatch 1962: Scuderia SSS di Venezia, Racing driver: Carlo Maria Abate, no 8, 4th overall and 1st in class
  • Ollon-Villars Hill climb 1962: Scuderia SSS di Venezia, Racing driver: Carlo Maria Abate, no 193, 4th overall and 1st in class
  • 1000 km de Paris Montlhery 1962: Scuderia SSS di Venezia, Racing drivers Colin Davis/Ludovico Scarfiotti, no 15, 3rd overall and 3rd in class

Ferrari SpA, by Ferrari Classiche, issues Attestation for vehicles of historic interest to “Breadvan”
Source: Ferrari

Maranello, 9 April – Ferrari SpA has recently issued an Attestation for vehicles of historic interest by the Ferrari Classiche department to the 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto (chassis 2819) nicknamed the “Breadvan”. The special document, which has been available since 2009, is dedicated to Ferrari cars that, although they do not comply with the strict Ferrari Authenticity Certification criteria, have been deemed, as a result of their competition and/or international recognized show history, to be of historic interest. Amongst the cars of historic interest from Ferrari, the Breadvan is probably one of the most emblematic models, considering its peculiar configuration.

The Breadvan is a unique model and the result of a very particular story. The car left the factory in Maranello in 1961 as a 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto (short wheelbase) “Competizione”, participating the same year in the Tour de France with Gendebien and Bianchi behind the wheel, before it was bought by Count Volpi di Misurata, who fielded it in the 1,000 km of Paris with Trintignant and Vaccarella with the Scuderia Serenissima.

In 1962 the Count instructed engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to re-design this car in order to compete with the 250 GTOs. Therefore the brakes and the suspension were modified and the car was fitted with an innovative and aerodynamic body, with a lowered engine, improving the car’s performance. The nickname Breadvan was invented by the British press, due to the characteristic shape. The first race the car participated in this configuration was the 24 Hours of Le Mans with Abate and Davis in the year of its transformation, although the car didn’t finish due to transmission problems. The Breadvan participated in several races with exceptional drivers like Scarfiotti at the 1,000 km of Paris until 1965 when it ran its last race, the Coppa Gallenga in Rome.

FERRARI CLASSICHE

This department was set up in 2006 to provide owners of classic Ferraris with maintenance, repair and restoration services, technical assistance and authenticity certification. Thus far, over 1,250 authenticity certificates have been issued. The certification process involves researching the cars’ original designs which are held in the Company’s own technical-historical archive. The Certificate of authenticity is aimed at road-going Ferraris of 20 years of age and over as well as all limited edition and competition cars, Formula 1s included, regardless of their year of construction. The certification document officially attests to the authenticity of the car for which it is issued. This acts as additional guarantee of the car’s status should the owner decide to sell it on. In 2009, Ferrari also introduced the new Attestation for vehicles of historic interest aimed at Ferraris that, although they do not comply with the strict Ferrari Authenticity Certification criteria, have been deemed, as a result of their competition and/or international recognized show history, to be of historic interest.

Of the restorations recently completed by Ferrari Classiche, five can be considered of particular relevance. The first two of these was the 250 GT (chassis no. 0419 GT), which won the Best Restoration prizes at the Villa d’Este and Cavallino Classic Concours d’Elegances. The second was the 250 GT Berlinetta passo corto (SWB, chassis no. 2735), driven to victory in four races in 1961 by Stirling Moss, who himself was present when the owner collected it from the Ferrari Classiche workshop. The other two were the 1955 750 Monza (chassis no. 0554), which was repainted in its original white livery with light blue central finish, and the Monoposto Corsa Indianapolis (chassis no. 0388), a unique 1953 single-seater developed as a prototype in preparation for the Indy 500 in which it never actually raced. It did, however, compete in several other events in the course of the 1950s. The most recent restoration work to be completed is the 250 LM (chassis 5845), year of construction 1964, winner at the 1965 Austrian GP held for Sport cars with a young and promising Jochen Rindt behind the wheel.

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